G.E.T. Dehumidifier with damp issues…

GET dehumidifier with damp issues…

Advertisements

Over a cuppa, my mother in law mentioned that she was chucking out a dehumidifer this weekend and had already replaced it.  This was a shock to me since it hadn’t started it’s journey to Worthing tip via my shed yet.  Time to intervene.

IMG_4937
FixItWorkshop, Jan’18, GET Dehumidifier repair.

Aparently it had overflowed water all over the floor and had cut out and not restarted.  It had probably been left to its own devices in their cellar, totally neglected in the run up to its demise.

Before worrying my toolbox, I usually plug things in and press buttons to see what happens.  When connecting this dehumidifier to the mains, it fired-up and seemed to run perfectly.  Strange.

Looking at the device in more detail revealed three tell-tale LED lights (cooling, empty the tank and running).  The tank was removable from the front and featured a small float operated level which married up to a small microswitch.  The idea being that when the water rose to the top, the switch would be activated by the float and the machine would cut out safely, all being well.

The lever mechanism on the float seemed to be stiff and all that was required to restore service was a good clean with a brush and Fairy liquid and some silicone spray, once dried.

IMG_4934
FixItWorkshop, Jan’18, GET Dehumidifier repair, microswitch.

While giving the unit a general inspection, I noticed dirt in the units’ grille.  Fortunately, the grille had a removable filter which had clearly never been cleaned, so in effect had been chocking the dehumidifer in normal operation.  Bad news.

Piecing the evidence together in my mind surrounding the causes of failure, I came up with the following theory.  The float had failed, causing the unit to leak.  The unit had then run hot, probably for a while and had probably tripped a thermal protection fuse.  I have no evidence for the latter idea as I never opened up the unit fully, but the theory fits the sequence of events.

In any case, the dehimidifier now switches on and switches off when full and doesn’t seem to run hot.  I was pleased with that.  I wasn’t so pleased that my in-laws wanted the unit back.

Cost of replacement: Circa £100.  Cost of repair; cleaning stuff.

 

Porsche Boxster leaky window seal

A little water leak repair on a Boxster.

Not strictly a FixItWorkshop blog article really, but hey!  It’s a cheap fix.

My beloved 2003 Boxster developed puddles in the umbrella holder on the passenger side (RHD car) when it rained hard.

The window was adjusted correctly and the door aligned properly, but when it rained, water ran down near the door mirror, under the seal, down the door card and in to the umbrella holder area.  Water leaks like this, especially on the passenger side (RHD car) are a real problem on the Boxster, since the cars’ ECU is mounted on the floor on that side and is big £££ to replace/ repair if it fails.

Seemingly, the door seal rubber on the car adjacent to the door mirror area had worn and become slightly porous and was allowing water to get in between the glass and seal.

New door seals are very expensive and to prove the issue, I applied a small trace of tap (faucet) silicone grease to the area to restore the wax-like finish, the seal should have to seal properly.

This has fixed the problem for now.  The door seal is worn and will need replacing in the long-term, but for now, this is a very cheap fix.

 

Leaking Reginox Miami Tap

A friend of mine had long been complaining about a leaking tap in his kitchen for some time, so it was a long overdue job for me to tackle.

A quick look online revealed lots of videos and help, but nothing covering the actual problem in this instance.

The tap spout was leaking from the swivel joint where the spout body is allowed to move approximately 180 degrees to move from sink to sink, in this case.  This is a fairly common problem for taps (faucet if you’re in America) of this design and sooner or later they all seem to suffer.

I was interested to know if the parts were available, but Internet searches revealed nothing.  An email to Reginox UK was answered very quickly and I was referred to Mayfair Brassware Ltd, the manufacturers of the tap in this instance.  The parts were quickly identified and delivered next day. Both companies were very helpful and efficient, useful for a non-plumber, like myself.

The cost of replacing the tap was about £50, so the £5 spent on replacement seals was well worth it.  The whole job was done in 10 minutes using basic tools.