Nice customer feedback: Bosch Athlet

A customer got in touch to say thanks. Always appreciated.

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It’s always good to get feedback on the stuff I write here and produce for YouTube.  I welcome it all, good and bad.

Here’s a nice one, relating to my Bosch Athlet repair, I received recently.  Makes it all worthwhile.  https://fixitworkshopblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/16/flimsy-bosch-athlet-25-2v-cordless-vacuum-cleaner.

From a chap who’s repaired his Athlet using my video.

Just a thank you.
I went looking for a solution to the intermittent cut-out on my Bosch Athlet and found your solution. It took all of about 2 minutes once I’d found a suitable length screw and works perfectly. Like it was designed that way.

In your video you thought maybe the handle was removable to allow the attachment of some accessory. It isn’t. It’s just a way of making the box smaller for shipping.

Which means if Bosch put the hole in, and supplied a screw, it would be a much better product. (But of course, then they could sell it as no assembly required:)

But seriously, thank you. I love the Athlet, but that bloody intermittent cutting-out was really beginning to bug me. If I’m ever in Worthing I’ll buy you a pint.

Name supplied.

Well, I know a few good pubs in Worthing!

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FixItWorkshop Aug’17, Bosch Athlet repair

Happy repairs.

Faulty Sun Solar Systems 1500W Pure Sine Wave Inverter (20/07/17)

I couldn’t save the Sun Solar Systems Inverter…

On the back of my Sterling Power Products inverter repair (https://fixitworkshopblog.wordpress.com/2017/04/07/sterling-power-products-pure-sine-wave-inverter-repaired/) a customer enquired to see if I could repair his faulty inverter.

The customer’s inverter had been connected up properly but had been severely overloaded and  it would appear that the protection modules within the inverter had not operated correctly.  Therefore a burning smell had been reported, just before final failure.

This was going to be a difficult repair as I had no schematic diagram for the main PCB and I was effectively going to be testing components in isolation using rudimentary methods.

A quick look around the inside of the unit revealed no obvious damage, but upon testing the IBGT transistors on the units’ high voltage output and several Zenner diodes in line with them, revealed serious damage to that part of the circuit.

These components are not cheap and collectively, the cost in parts alone would have been over £50, without my time factored in and without the guarantee that the unit would work again.  On that basis, sadly, I had to inform the customer that the unit was beyond my help and probably beyond economical repair.  It will therefore be disposed of responsibly at our local amenity tip.

 

Hillbilly Compact Light / lite Golf Trolley going nowhere (motor needs new brushes)

A frustrated customer brought this ‘stationary’ mobile golf trolley in to the workshop recently.  He’d replaced the control unit along with the hand controller.  The battery was also new, but the trolley wouldn’t respond to the controls.

A systematic test of the wiring revealed no problems and power was getting to the motor OK.  However, with the unit switched on, every now and then, the motor would make a noise, a faint hum.

This indicated that the motor, a Lemac 65178-101, was trying to do something.  A few searches online revealed that the Hillbilly Compact is no longer made and parts, including the motor, are hard to obtain for reasonable money, this is a shame as the unit is only just over 10 years old.

The customer likes this particular model due to its lightweight and compact folding ability.  New ones are several hundred pounds and usually heavier.

Since the rest of this trolley is serviceable, it seemed sensible to have a go at a repair.  With the motor removed, the cause of the fault became clear.  The commutator was heavily blackened and scored and one of the brushes had burned away, probably due to the heavy weight the trolley had lugged around a golf course.

Being realistic about spend on parts, I thought it would be a good idea to order some replacement brushes from Amazon.  These brushes will come from Hong Kong via Sourcingmap (an excellent source of hard to get parts) and I will let you all know how I get on with the repair.  The motor’s back-plate is available online for just over £15 plus P&P, but I like to repair the problem, rather than waste components that still work.

More to come… I expect you can’t wait.

One the new brushes are fitted and the commutator cleaned, I hope the motor will spin once again.

20/08/17

The brushes arrived and fitted perfectly.  Time will tell if the brush material stands up to the tough punishment of lugging golf clubs across a green, but for £2.41, the repair was worth a try.  See video.

Here are a few photos of the motor refitted to the golf trolley.

Cost of a replacement golf trolley is circa £300+; The cost of the parts to repair this one; £2.41.

04/09/17

Well after some ‘light use’ the owner of the golf trolley contacted me to report that it had failed again, my heart sank!  After a few hundred yards, the trolley came to a halt, which caused some amusement on the fairway…

After testing all the wiring again, I suspected the motor once more.  After removing the motor, I saw that one of the brushes had stuck to the carrier, hmm, interesting.  It seemed that the brushes I’d fitted had run ‘hot’ and started to deteriorate prematurely, which was a shame.  When I ordered these to ‘fit’ this motor, there was always a risk that they wouldn’t last as long, since I didn’t know the exact specification for the motor- I took an educated guess, which turned out to be wrong!

I looked online again and discovered another set of brushes available for this Lemac motor, from http://www.lambeggolfshop.com, for a very reasonable £8.48, including delivery within 48 hours. I didn’t find these brushes the first time, so I must have used different search criteria, this time.

The motor now spins freely and it’s fitted back to the trolley and I hope this time, it makes a round to the 19th hole!

 

Porsche Boxster leaky window seal

A little water leak repair on a Boxster.

Not strictly a FixItWorkshop blog article really, but hey!  It’s a cheap fix.

My beloved 2003 Boxster developed puddles in the umbrella holder on the passenger side (RHD car) when it rained hard.

The window was adjusted correctly and the door aligned properly, but when it rained, water ran down near the door mirror, under the seal, down the door card and in to the umbrella holder area.  Water leaks like this, especially on the passenger side (RHD car) are a real problem on the Boxster, since the cars’ ECU is mounted on the floor on that side and is big £££ to replace/ repair if it fails.

Seemingly, the door seal rubber on the car adjacent to the door mirror area had worn and become slightly porous and was allowing water to get in between the glass and seal.

New door seals are very expensive and to prove the issue, I applied a small trace of tap (faucet) silicone grease to the area to restore the wax-like finish, the seal should have to seal properly.

This has fixed the problem for now.  The door seal is worn and will need replacing in the long-term, but for now, this is a very cheap fix.

 

Bissell Powerlifter Pet noisy roller beaters

Now, some of you will remember that I’ve written about a similar issue before, but I think it’s worth covering again as often, complete replacement items need to be purchased, which can be costly.

This Bissell Powerlifter Pet vacuum cleaner had snapped a belt, due to an obstruction in the roller/ beater area and while the casing was open to replace the belt, I removed the beater to see how smoothly it turned.  It was noisy.

Seemingly, Bissell will only supply a complete unit for around £30, with shipping, so given the overall value of the machine, it seemed sensible to have a look at the noisy component on the bench.  The bearing housings, located at each end of the roller, come out easily and with some careful manipulation, each bearing can be removed.

On this unit, both bearings were dirty and dry.  Now, I could have replaced them with a generic bearing, but in the spirit of thrift, I decided to clean the bearing races with brake cleaner and then repack with high-melt-point grease.  When reassembled to the roller/ beater, it ran very smoothly and was much quieter, once re-fitted to the vacuum cleaner.  Job done.

 

Blocked Hoover Steam Cleaner

Hoover Steam Cleaner Repaired!

I’ll put money on the fact that many steam cleaners like this one are thrown away needlessly due to blockages which could be easily cleared using everyday items.

This Hoover S2IN1300C hand held steam cleaner appeared to switch on OK (LED lamp on), the pump ran OK, but even with a full tank of water, no steam came out of the steam nozzle.

Off with the cover and after checking the pipes for leaks and pinches, it appeared that all was well.  The pump did indeed run and the boiler appeared to get very hot.

After a fair bit of dismantling, it appeared that the nozzle was blocked by a build-up of chalk.

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Hoover Hand Held Steam Cleaner, July’17, repaired at the FixItWorkshop, Worthing, England.

Cost of replacement; £30-50, cost of repair – some white vinegar.

Have a look at the video…

 

 

 

 

Slow Fisher-Price Mechanical Music Box Record Player

Repaired Fisher Price record player

Here’s a blast from the past:  A mechanical toy, that’s really cool.  One that brings fond memories from my childhood… I’m 38 as I write this.

Strictly speaking, this is not a customer’s toy, but a family heirloom which had been festering in the shed for over 20 years.  Consequently, it now wasn’t in great shape.

After dusting it down, we realised that records were playing intermittently and slowly at best and the problem seemed related to the rather cool winding mechanism within.

After dismantling the unit and giving the mechanicals a light service, the turntable platter turned freely once again.  Our two year old daughter can now play with the record player as her mum did – very cute.

Enjoy!